Global_Flood

Ceres: Remains of an Exploded Planet, Conclusion

 

By Clint Bishard

Jesus Created Ministries

 

Two weeks ago, I provided a list of the reasons why I believe Ceres and the asteroid belt can be better explained as the remains of an exploded planet, than left over dust as predicted by the secular nebular hypothesis.† In conclusion from this evidence, I view Ceres not as a planet; but it, as well as the asteroids, as part of the remnants of a past planet that blew up.† I believe this planet was part of Godís original perfect design as indicated by Ceres and most of the asteroids being located at the orbit location as predicted by the mathematical formula for the position of the planets.

Since we are dealing with historical events, we cannot prove that a planet blew up in the past by the scientific method (no observable and repeatable experiments here), so the past planet Phaeton will have to remain a hypothesis.† I only wish the scientific community would realize the same thing about the hypothesis of evolution and quit discussing it as a fact or even a theory.† However, we can take note that a lot of evidence exists in support of this Phaeton hypothesis.† Additionally, we can see that the evidence in our solar system fits with a perfectly created solar system, which now appears to have been corrupted in the past.† The Biblical Christian can take comfort that the evidence in our solar system is consistent with the Bibleís history.

Many have been following this series on Astronomy from the original introduction which asked the question of whether or not Pluto should be a planet.† We have covered many design aspects of the astronomy of our solar system to set the foundation for this discussion.† We should finally be able to conclude this series next week with the discussion of Pluto and where it fits in the solar system.† Is it a planet?† I hope you will join me next week to here my viewpoint on this much debated issue.

 

Go to part 9 of this series

Jesus Created Ministries (JCM) www.JesusCreated.org - Page last updated January 12, 2007